Irish Rail: Exposed hydraulic lines

By The Helpful Engineer / On / In Infrastructure

Just wondering if anyone knows what the exposed hydraulic lines at the front of this type of Irish Rail commuter trains are for, see below.

Irish Rail commuter train without front guards

I am interested as they should be protected by front guards but are missing in this case. Without the guards the lines and the on/off handle seem to be exposed and ready to be damaged by debris catching on them while the train is traveling. Should we be worried? In any case the picture below shows the front with the protection guard in place.

Irish Rail commuter train with front guards
Irish Rail commuter train with front guards

The Worlds first ever fatal car accident, Birr, County Offaly

By The Helpful Engineer / On / In Infrastructure

Route taken by car prior to accidentPeople might be surprised to read that the first fatal car accident occurred in Birr, County Offaly close to the centre of Ireland. I only realised when I was passing by the actually spot on my way to Birr Castle recently. There is a large notice board describing the events on the road side  which I stopped to read and then look at the junction where the accident occurred.

The events occurred on the 31st of August 1869 when the passenger, Mary Ward, fell out of a steam powered car while it was turning sharply at a junction. She was fatally wounded with a broken neck. The car was destroyed afterwards, thus following the custom at the time, where animals were killed if they caused human deaths.

Read more “The Worlds first ever fatal car accident, Birr, County Offaly”

Walking our engineering landmarks: Parteen Weir

By The Helpful Engineer / On / In Historic Buildings

Parteen WeirPeople go walking for lots of reasons. But what about combining a walk with some of our engineering heritage? Its easy to do. Just look up a few interesting engineering landmarks on the net, find them on Google Earth and see if there is a safe walking route nearby. I did this a while ago and visited Parteen weir on the River Shannon.

The Shannon Hydro Electic Scheme. Parteen Weir forms part of the Shannon Hydro Electric Scheme. When constructed in 1924, the Shannon hydro project, was the largest hydro electric project in the World. The electricity generated at the time was sufficient to supply the whole of Ireland. Read more about the scheme here and here.

Read more “Walking our engineering landmarks: Parteen Weir”

Dublin moments. Glimpses of a unique place

By The Helpful Engineer / On / In Uncategorized

Its great to work in Dublin City Centre. It may not have the splendour of Paris, nor the scale of London, or even the simple street grid system of New York. But it is a great, unique and chaotic city. It is hard to define, but a great place to experience. I have tried to give a taste of Dublin’s everyday essence below. You wont find these pictures in the tourist brochures!

Read more “Dublin moments. Glimpses of a unique place”

Confused. When does Summer begin?

By The Helpful Engineer / On / In Technical & Discussion

DaffodilsThe days are getting longer and warmer. The daffodils have been and gone, briefly acting like a natural form of roadside artwork. It’s the time of the year when the central heating can be turned off and the boiler (and your wallet) given a well earned rest, and perhaps a service.

But is anyone else confused about when the seasons begin and end? Most countries in Europe consider Summer, for instance, to be June, July and August.

Read more “Confused. When does Summer begin?”

The tin church in Sallins

By The Helpful Engineer / On / In Historic Buildings

Sallins churchIn 1924, a local priest, Father Norris, opened the doors of a new chapel, in the village of Sallins, County Kildare. It was built to save the people of Sallins the 7 km (4 mile) round trip to the otherwise nearest church, in Naas. This chapel, which is my local church, is known as a ‘tin church’.

Tin churches. Tin churches date from one hundred years ago. They were pre-fabricated buildings which arrived on site, from the manufacturer, in kit form (IKEA style). They are constructed with timber structural frames and floors. Timber boarding was used to clad the internal walls. While externally, the walls and roof were clad with corrugated iron sheeting, hence the name ‘tin churches’. The buildings are usually supported on brick foundations, separated from the timber frame with slates, to prevent rising damp.

Read more “The tin church in Sallins”

Eurovision 2014: How to pick a winning song

By The Helpful Engineer / On / In People & Media

Eurovision 2014
Eurovision 2014

The 59th  Eurovision final in on tonight in Copenhagen, Denmark. Unfortunately Ireland’s entry, ‘Can-linn‘ (now called can’t win), wont be in the final as they were knocked out at the semi-final stage. Ireland are the most successful country in Eurovision history having won the contest 7 times. However our last win was in 1997. Our best place finish since 2000 has been 8th. We need to improve.

What can we do to increase our changes of getting to the final and winning?

Read more “Eurovision 2014: How to pick a winning song”

hublot replicarolex replica uktag heuer replicareplica rolex salerolex replicarolex replicarolex replica salerolex replica